Albania Mission Against
Human Trafficking

MARY WARD LORETO is planting hope with a human rights approach to combating modern day slavery. This challenging mission is implemented through works of justice, education, grass roots action and systemic change. The aim is to eradicate poverty, the prime cause for human trafficking.

Last Media News

The 8th Annual International Symposium on Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling is taking place today in Brussels.

Four members of RENATE (Religious in Europe Networking Against Trafficking and Exploitation) are attending this event and the President of Mary Ward Loreto Foundation/ RENATE, Imelda Poole (IBVM), representing Albania.

The delegates of this Annual International Symposium will:

  • Explore how to build effective multi-agency cooperation to ensure the conviction of perpetrators
  • Consider ways to safeguard victims by strengthening victim support
  • Take part in interactive discussions with key stakeholders and share best practice in the protection of trafficking victims
  • Examine how to better identify, protect and support victims of sexual exploitation through the delivery a person-centred safeguarding system
  • Share ideas on and transfer current knowledge of available training and education for frontline staff to ensure that they are qualified to identify and assess victims of trafficking
  • Evaluate the importance of partnership working and discuss how best to implement effective multi-sector collaboration;

The trafficking in human beings has, over the last decade, increased significantly. According to the International Labour Organisation, in 2012 there were 20.9 million people were victims of forced labour and sexual exploitation in the world. In the period 2013-14 EU countries reported 15,846 victims of human trafficking, 76% of which were women and girls according to a European Commission report. It is estimated that two out of three registered victims (67%) were trafficked for sexual exploitation, 21% for other types of forced labour and 12% for other types of exploitation. Please click here for more

 

The Hämeenlinna conference turned out to be once again a place where researchers could meet, exchange ideas, projects and research via workshops, training, educational activities, interactive sessions, transformational labs, and other opportunities for cooperation and discussion. The included conference papers will take you back to Hämeenlinna and the most interesting findings shared during the conference.

Mrs. Shpresa Deliaj, Board Member of the MWL Education Project since the beginning, presented in this conference the findings of the MWL Education research “Ethics in the Education System”.

Please find in this publication the MWL Education Project paper and the findings of the study report “Ethics in the Education System” shared during the conference.

Please click here to download the EAPRIL 2017 PROCEEDINGS. (You will find the MWL Education output on the page 310 – 319.)

 

Introduction for Easter Newsletter

It seems appropriate that this introduction is being written on March 8th, the day when we remember human rights for women all over the world. This morning nearly all of the MWL staff were engaged in women’s rights events, even the men! The march was led by many women but also men took a leadership role, working for human rights for all.  Together we can make such a difference…. Please click here to read the MWL Newsletter No.9 in English.

Ju lutem klikoni këtu për të lexuar MWL Newsletter-in Nr.9 në Shqip.

 

The award ceremony took place on March 15 in Bristol. The short film competition was announced by the organisation Unchosen who use the power of film in fight against-modern slavery.

“Ivan died at the age of 48, at the consequences of the disease less than two years after his rescue. It was on February 7, 2016 – the eve of Saint Bakhita´s Day, the patron of trafficked victims….”

See the winning film:

 

 

“Migrant workers, like all workers, are entitled to fair treatment and fair treatment for migrant workers is also key to preserving the social fabric of our societies and to sustainable development.” Message from ILO Director-General, Mr. Guy Ryders

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For the United Nations, the pursuit of social justice for all is at the core of our global mission to promote development and human dignity. The adoption by the International Labour Organization of the Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization is just one recent example of the UN system’s commitment to social justice. The Declaration focuses on guaranteeing fair outcomes for all through employment, social protection, social dialogue, and fundamental principles and rights at work.

2018 theme: Workers on the Move: the Quest for Social Justice

Most migration today is linked directly or indirectly to the search for decent work opportunities. Even if employment is not the primary driver, it usually features in the migration process at some point.

There are an estimated 258 million international migrants. The ILO estimates that there are roughly 150 million migrant workers.

Among migrant workers, 56 percent are men and 44 percent are women.

Migrant workers account for 4.4 percent of all workers and have higher labor force participation rates than non-migrants globally (73 percent and 64 percent respectively).

http://www.un.org/en/events/socialjusticeday/